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Freehand agrees deal to support adoption of its surgical robots

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Freehand's robots support more accurate and safer keyhole procedures

Guildford-based medical technology company has formed a partnership to support the adoption of its surgical robots by hospitals in India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia and the Caribbean.

Freehand, whose robots support safer and more efficient keyhole procedures by providing rock-steady images to surgeons and removing the need for camera-holding assistants in theatre, will work with Imperial Medical Solutions (IMS) to introduce its technology to several international healthcare markets in conjunction with local distributors.

IMS is leveraging its clinical experience and international network to drive healthcare digitisation in developing markets. It is already working with Freehand and a university in the Caribbean to roll-out Freehand’s surgical robots in hospitals and healthcare institutions.

Jeremy Russell, CEO of Freehand, said: “Freehand and IMS share a strong belief in helping healthcare systems around the world adopt new technologies that improve patient outcomes.

“This partnership with a team of incredibly well-connected clinical experts will help accelerate our international expansion plans and ensure that the benefits of Freehand are felt around the world.”

Ram Senasi, chairman of IMS, and consultant paediatric radiologist in the NHS, added: “IMS is taking proven, agile and affordable medical technology to countries early in their digital medicine journey.

“We see Freehand as an important partner in our mission to reduce the gap in medical outcomes between rich and poor and democratise access to best medical care.

“We only introduce technology that we are 100% sure makes a difference to patient care and outcomes, and we look forward to working closely with Freehand and our partners around the world to improve the safety and efficiency of minimally invasive and digital medicine procedures.”

Freehand’s robots have been used in more than 15,000 laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures to date.

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